Tagged: pubs in sussex

Celebrating beers with a difference at the Shepherd & Dog

 

Large country pubs become something of a magnet when the summer months come around, thanks to a combination of fine weather and a large garden. Here at the Shepherd & Dog, we like to try something a little different sometimes, and of course we like to make the most of our setting amid the natural splendour of the South Downs National Park.

 

This July, we’re hosting our Wild Beer Tap Takeover, a celebration of all that’s wonderful about traditional yet innovative brewing techniques. It’s free to enter this event, there’s no need to book in advance or to buy a ticket, you just turn up with a thirst and perhaps an open mind about which ingredients could and should be included in certain beers. For some people, this could turn out to be something of a journey into the unknown.

 

The Wild Beer Company is based on a farm in rural Somerset, where they brew with imagination and flair against a backdrop of picturesque countryside. They have a passion for brewing with unorthodox yeasts and somewhat alternative fermentations, and the end result is a range of beers which have to be experienced to be believed.

 

Glorious ingredients, glorious beers

 

Their current range includes beers flavoured with ingredients such as limes, salt, pineapple, rhubarb, honey, ginger, chocolate, seaweed, vanilla, coffee, pepper, sourdough and so much more. We love the way they combine what might be seen as unusual ingredients with an appreciative nod to traditional brewing processes, resulting in a stunning selection of beers which cover the whole taste spectrum.

 

Needless to say, here at the Shepherd & Dog we are synonymous with the type of fine dining Sussex has become famous for, and our superb summer menu will be available to complement the Wild Beer event. Here’s a golden opportunity to give your summer a bit of a twist, and to celebrate the union of fabulous beer and exquisite food.

 

 

The Wild Beer Tap Takeover is on July 26th at the Shepherd & Dog in Fulking, one of the finest gastropubs in Sussex.

We love our perfect South Downs location

 

Here at the Shepherd & Dog, we’re understandably proud of our location right in the heart of the South Downs National Park. This is a truly beautiful part of the world, and it’s one that lends itself perfectly to the gentle art of relaxation. Whether you’re in the area for long, lonely rambles or a friendly stroll with the family, the chance to call in and see us surely shouldn’t be overlooked.

 

This is the UK’s newest National Park, having been given this official status in 2011, but of course the countryside that surrounds us has remained blissfully unspoilt for many centuries. If you’re ever in the mood for a VERY long walk, the South Downs Way runs from Winchester in the west to Eastbourne in the east for a distance of around a hundred miles.

 

Here at the Shepherd & Dog, we’ve been providing refreshments to walkers and ramblers for many decades, and we’re understandably proud of the welcome we offer to a diverse cross-section of people throughout the seasons. Our unique location in the picturesque village of Fulking places us in the ideal position to offer superb drinks and fine dining to locals and visitors from all over the world.

 

Proud to offer the evening dining Brighton people love

 

We enjoy a peaceful spot at the foot of the fabled Devil’s Dyke, a 100m deep valley which has been an important tourist attraction for a number of years. Of all the pubs in Sussex, we feel ours is in a truly fabulous location. Devil’s Dyke has an interesting mythology about it, having been named after an ancient tale concerning the digging of a ditch by the devil himself in order to flood the valley.

 

In Victorian times, Devil’s Dyke was a hugely popular tourist attraction, and was home to a fairground and a couple of bandstands. These days, you’re more likely to see paragliding enthusiasts looking to make the most of the winds, and many of them pop into the Shepherd & Dog after their adventures have come to a close for the day.

 

We offer a superb lunch menu here, and on summer days many of our patrons head into our large garden to make the most of the warm weather. When the evenings come around, our dinner menu tempts visitors from across the region, as our talented chefs create the type of fine dining Sussex has become increasingly famous for. Why not pay us a visit and find out for yourself?

 

The Shepherd & Dog is a large, friendly and welcoming pub and restaurant in the South Downs National Park. We pride ourselves on being one of the most iconic pubs in Sussex.

The Cure for Everything – Except Hangovers!

With our Gin and jazz night coming up at the end of next week, I thought you might like to know a little more about the history of what for a long time was the nations favourite tipple.

A Sussex Country Pub Favourite

Sussex Country PubsYou might be surprised to learn that starting from humble beginnings, the old G&T has a long and really quite complicated history, filled with a level of intrigue, that belies its simple ingredients.

It’s thought that Gin was invented in the 16th century in Leiden, Holland by one Dr. Sylvius de Bouve.  It was originally prescribed as medical treatment said to aid circulation. It made its way to the UK, where, due largely to being cheap, it became the beverage of choice.  By 1750, over 11 million gallons were being downed by Londoners every year.  Eventually, the level of drinking became such a problem that a series of laws had to be introduced to  curb the general populations’ reliance on the spirit, and by the mid-19th century gin came to be considered a gentleman’s drink.

In 1857 the British Crown formally took over the government of India, and as Empire spread more Brits began to make their way to the subcontinent and other warm postings. They struggled with the ravages of malaria and boredom in tropical climates when some smart (and sweaty) colonial  figured out the cure for both of these evils – The Gin and Tonic.

http://qtonic.com/history.html

Purely Medicinal My Dear

At that time tonic water was infused heavily with quinine, which was an extract from the South American cinchona tree.  Known to locals as the “fever tree” because its bark was able to stop chills, cinchona bark was first brought to Europe in the 1640s when it was shown to both cure and prevent malaria.  So tonic water  became an essential part of Britain’s colonial expansion, even though its taste was bitter and harsh. Brits soon found that the addition of gin, sugar, ice, and citrus was the perfect way to temper the bitterness and make the cure palatable.   And as a bonus, the inclusion of limes prevented scurvy, which was always a problem during the long sea voyages to the postings.

 

The Modern Pub Version

Nowadays tonic water is much more palatable, with much smaller doses of quinine and more sweetening agents, making the G&T as popular as ever.  Quibble ass we may over the details (how much ice to use, lemon versus lime or cucumber, proper ratios etc.), we can all agree: the timeless gin and tonic really does seem to cure all ills.

Except hangovers, that is.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gin_and_tonic